The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry.
Ralph Waldo Emerson (via achamois)
(Reblogged from linguisten)
(Reblogged from vive-la-revolution-francaise)

onlyartists:

Édouard Maugendre-Villers

Bust of Georges Danton

(Reblogged from trahisonprisonetguillotine)

valinaraii:

joachimmurat:

valinaraii:

joachimmurat:

tiny-librarian:

A 19th century miniature of Napoleon as first consul.

Source

*smoulders*

Actual Disney First Consul.

He just needs a sensitive musical number and a sarcastic animal sidekick.

Something from the Napoleon musical + sarcastic Marengo.

(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)

graceless-s:

Et des boyaux du dernier prêtre
Serrons le cou du dernier roi.

(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)

royalvaisseaux:

Another pic I took and edited cause I was bored. “Don the medals and prepare for battle!” Setting: 1792 France, Battle of Valmy. Pistol from Germany. Tricorn from amazon. Maps from books. Medals from jewelers. Cockade from etsy. Little soldiers from Hat 1/32 kit, painted by me. ~Royalvaisseaux.

(Reblogged from trahisonprisonetguillotine)

“It is a moment at which he [Saint-Just] deserves our admiration. He knows that Robespierre’s life is threatened by his enemies on the Committee. Although he is Robespierre’s friend he has only to say nothing, and it is likely that his reputation with the army will save him. But he is not that sort of man. His pride, if not his friendship, prevents such a betrayal. He stands up alone to protect Robespierre, and does not even say a word in his own defense.”

— J.M. Thompson, Leaders of the French Revolution (pg. 204)

(Source: unspeakablevice)

(Reblogged from vive-la-revolution-francaise)

La bataille de Valmy, 20 Septembre 1792 by Jean-Baptiste Mauzaisse. 

(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)

Caricature by Isaac Cruikshank, depicting Napoleon as a toy solder fighting at Toulon.

(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)
Citizens, by what illusion could one persuade himself that you are inhuman. Your Revolutionary Tribunal has condemned three hundred rascals to death in a year. Has not the Spnish Inquisition done worse that that, and great God, for what a cause! Have the English assizes butchered no one in that period? What of Bender, who roasts Belgian babies? What of the dungeons of Germany, where people are entombed, do you ever hear of them?W hat of the kings of Europe, does any one prate to them of pity? Ah, do not allow yourselves to grow soft-hearted!…
Saint-Just, from his February 26th speech made in response to the Convention’s order that the Committees of Public Safety and General Security present a report on the thousands of political prisoners awaiting trial. Translation from Geoffrey Bruun’s Saint-Just: Apostle of the Terror (pg 96)
(Reblogged from unspeakablevice)
shapingcontours:

Gown of a noble woman of the German Renaissance - 1540
I like especially the bodice and the sleeves on this gown. Very beautiful!
(via Historical Fashions)

shapingcontours:

Gown of a noble woman of the German Renaissance - 1540

I like especially the bodice and the sleeves on this gown. Very beautiful!

(via Historical Fashions)

(Reblogged from trahisonprisonetguillotine)
The French revolutionaries have come through their baptism by fire. They expected more from us. Now we have fallen in their estimation but they have risen. We have lost more than a battle. Our credibility is gone. The 20th of September has given the world a new shape. It is the most important day of the century!
Prussian Colonol von Massenbach on his defeat at Valmy.  (via bunniesandbeheadings)
(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)

And so the day [20 September 1792, Battle of Valmy] was over; the French could not be shifted, Kellerman had chosen the more favorable position; our men had been pulled out of the firing line and everything was back to where it was before.The greatest consternation spread throgh the army. Only that morning all they had in mind was skewering the French and eating them for breakfast. Indeed, it was this unconditional confidence in this army and its commander which had seduced me into joining this perilous expedition. But now everyone kept his own counsel, did not meet the eyes of his comrades, and if he did give tongue, it was only to curse or complaint. Just as darkness was falling, I and my companions had formed a circle, at the center of which we couldn’t even start a fire, as was usual. Most stayed silent, few spoke, but no one could come up with an opinion or verdict on the day’s events. Eventually, they turned to me and asked me what I thought about it, for in the past I had usually cheered them up and stimulated them with pithy epigrams; but on this occasion I just said:

“From here and today there begins a new epoch in the history of the world, and you can say you were there.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Compagne in Frankreich vol. xxxiii. Translated from the original German by TCW Blanning.  (via bunniesandbeheadings)
(Reblogged from bunniesandbeheadings)
(Reblogged from trahisonprisonetguillotine)
(Reblogged from viscountnelson)