ladyhistory:

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hey george

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hey look you’re smiling

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george what are you doing

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stop playing george your face will freeze like that

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GEORGE NO

(Reblogged from ladyhistory)
napoleondidthat:

That time Napoleon was called out to calm down the attack of the vegetables attacking quiet Parisian streets.

napoleondidthat:

That time Napoleon was called out to calm down the attack of the vegetables attacking quiet Parisian streets.

(Reblogged from n-nevskaya-n)
Let us…tally the grim catalog of disasters that had befallen [Alexander Hamilton and his brother] between 1765 and 1769: their father had vanished, their mother had died, their cousin and supposed protector had committed bloody suicide, and their aunt, uncle, and grandmother had all died. … Their short lives had been shadowed by a stupefying sequence of bankruptcies, marital separations, deaths, scandals, and disinheritance. Such repeated shocks must have stripped Alexander Hamilton of any sense that life was fair, that he existed in a benign universe, or that he could ever count on help from anyone. That this abominable childhood produced such a strong, productive, self-reliant human being—that this fatherless adolescent could have ended up a founding father of a country he had not yet even seen—seems little short of miraculous. Because he maintained perfect silence about his unspeakable past, never exploiting it to puff up his later success, it was impossible for his contemporaries to comprehend the exceptional nature of his personal triumph.

Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton

Hamilton gets no respect.

(via prettayprettaygood)

(Reblogged from publius-esquire)

the manuscripts of the masters: classical music

bach
beethoven
chopin
rachmaninoff  
rimsky-korsakov
schubert
tchaikovsky

(Source: holodecked)

(Reblogged from theswisscheese)
(Reblogged from napoleondidthat)
[Camille Desmoulins] had a stutter, but despite countless attempts to find a remedy, only one worked, which his family discovered when Camille was eleven. One of his father’s military friends visited the house and made a comment about the laziness of the poor, at which the enraged Desmoulins blurted out an eloquent tirade without a single stumble. Maybe doctors should try this with any patient who stutters, suggesting ‘Have you tried an angry speech about the monarchy?’
Mark Steel’s Vive La Revolution.

"The HOPES of the PARTY prior to July 14th____"from such wicked crown & anchor-dreams, good Lord deliver us."

The first hint of radicalism came when he befriended some of the peasants in his area and produced three pamphlets recording his horror at their conditions.
Mark Steel’s Vive la Revolution
About Robespierre
The great appear great because we are on our knees: Let us rise.
Attributed to Camille Desmoulins in Histoire de France (1848)
"The Tree of Liberty must be planted immediately! this is the ‘Something which must be done’ and that quickly too! to save the Country from destruction - Vide Sentiments [toasts] of Whig Club Feby 14th 1797"

"The Tree of Liberty must be planted immediately! this is the ‘Something which must be done’ and that quickly too! to save the Country from destruction - Vide Sentiments [toasts] of Whig Club Feby 14th 1797"

The history of randomly drawn political borders - Palestine, Northern Ireland, and the partition of India for example - has always provided a very helpful pointer to indicate where the next war is going to be.
John O’Farrell’s An Utterly Impartial History of Britain: Or 2000 Years of Upper Class Idiots in Charge.
"Cour martiale assemblée pour juger un deserteur de la Grande Armée"

(Court martial assembled to judge a deserter of the Grand Army)

"Cour martiale assemblée pour juger un deserteur de la Grande Armée"

(Court martial assembled to judge a deserter of the Grand Army)

It is during this catastrophic first century of Anglo-Saxon conquest that the immortal British hero King Arthur is thought to have lived. The legend recalls that in the face of this Teutonic onslaught, one chivalrous king gathered his court at Camelot and then rode out to fight the pagan invaders with such heroism and Christian forbearance that his name has lived on for evermore. Clearly there would have been Celtic chiefs leading their people in defence of their lands and there was a battle at somewhere called ‘Badon Hill’ that seems to have halted the advance of the Saxons for around fifty years. But the name Arthur does not appear in any records until hundreds of years after he was supposed to have lived and the first account of his heroics says that all the 960 people killed in the battle of Badon Hill were slain by Arthur alone — so clearly a very reliable source.
John O’Farrell’s An Utterly Impartial History of Britain: Or 2000 Years of Upper Class Idiots in Charge.

"This is his first processed tree carcass."